dementor harry potter – Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban was published a year later in the UK on 8 July 1999 and in the US on 8 S…

dementor harry potter – Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban was published a year later in the UK on 8 July 1999 and in the US on 8 S…

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban was published a year later in the UK on 8 July 1999 and in the US on 8 September 1999.[13][14]Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire was published 8 July 2000, simultaneously by Bloomsbury and Scholastic.[15]Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is the longest book in the series, yet it is the second shortest film at 2 hours and 18 minutes.[16] After the publishing of Order of the Phoenix, the sixth book of the series, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, was published on 16 July 2005 and sold 9 million copies in the first 24 hours of its worldwide release.[1][17] The seventh and final novel, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, was published 21 July 2007.[18] The book sold 11 million copies within 24 hours of its release: 2.7 million copies in the UK and 8.3 million in the US.[17] Main article: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (film) In 2007, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix was released in a film version directed by David Yates and written by Michael Goldenberg.

A spin-off prequel series that will consist of five films started with Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2016), marking the beginning of the Wizarding World shared media franchise.

All material belongs to Warner Bros.

All material belongs to Warner Bros.
I Do Not Own Anything.All the Rights in This Content Belong to Their Respective Owner/s.

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for \”fair use\” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.

and a real historical person, a 14th-century scribe, Sir Nicolas Flamel, is described as a holder of the Philosopher’s Stone.[40] Other medieval elements in Hogwarts include coats-of-arms and medieval weapons on the walls, letters written on parchment and sealed with wax, the Great Hall of Hogwarts which is similar to the Great Hall of Camelot, the use of Latin phrases, the tents put up for Quidditch tournaments are similar to the “marvellous tents” put up for knightly tournaments, imaginary animals like dragons and unicorns which exist around Hogwarts, and the banners with heraldic animals for the four Houses of Hogwarts.[40] Many of the motifs of the Potter stories such as the hero’s quest invoking objects that confer invisibility, magical animals and trees, a forest full of danger and the recognition of a character based upon scars are drawn from medieval French Arthurian romances.[40] Other aspects borrowed from French Arthurian romances include the use of owls as messengers, werewolves as characters, and white deer.[40] The American scholars Heather Arden and Kathrn Lorenz in particular argue that many aspects of the Potter stories are inspired by a 14th-century French Arthurian romance, Claris et Laris, writing of the “startling” similarities between the adventures of Potter and the knight Claris.[40] Arden and Lorenz noted that Rowling graduated from the University of Exeter in 1986 with a degree in French literature and spent a year living in France afterwards.[40] Arnden and Lorenz wrote about the similarity between the Arthurian romances, where Camelot is a place of wonder and safety, and from where the heroic knights must venture forth facing various perils, usually in an enchanted forest;and Hogwarts, likewise a wondrous safe place, where Harry Potter and friends must periodically venture forth from to the magical forest that surrounds Hogwarts.[40] In the same way that knights in the Arthurian romances usually have a female helper, who is very intelligent and has a connection with nature, Harry has Hermione who plays a similar role.[40] Like an Arthurian knight, Harry receives advice and encouragement from his mentor, Albus Dumbledore, who resembles both Merlin and King Arthur, but must vanquish his foes alone.[40] Arnden and Lorenz wrote that with Rowling’s books, the characters are “…not a simple reworking of the well-known heroes of romance, but a protean melding of different characters to form new ones…”.[40] However, Lorenz and Arnden argue the main inspiration for Harry Potter was Sir Percival, one of the Knights of the Round Table who searches for the Holy Grail.[40] Both Potter and Sir Percival had an “orphaned or semi-orphaned youth, with inherent nobility and powers”, being raised by relatives who tried to keep them away from the places where they really belong, Hogwarts and Camelot respectively.[40] Both Percival and Potter are however outsiders in the places that they belong, unfamiliar with the rules of knighthood and magic, but both show extraordinary natural abilities with Percival proving himself an exceptional fighter while Potter is an excellent player of Quidditch.[40] And finally, both Percival and Potter found love and acceptance from surrogate families, in the form of the Knights of the Round Table and the Weasley family respectively.[40] Each of the seven books is set over the course of one school year.Rowling (Joanne Kathleen Rowling), using her grandmother’s name as her second name because she has no middle name.[56][58] Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone was published by Bloomsbury, the publisher of all Harry Potter books in the United Kingdom, on 26 June 1997.[59] It was released in the United States on 1 September 1998 by Scholastic – the American publisher of the books – as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,[60] after Rowling had received US$105,000 for the American rights – a record amount for a children’s book by an unknown author.[61] Fearing that American readers would not associate the word “philosopher” with magic (although the Philosopher’s Stone is an ancient tradition in alchemy), Scholastic insisted that the book be given the title Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone for the American market.[62] The second book, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, was originally published in the UK on 2 July 1998 and in the US on 2 June 1999.

Further information: List of Harry Potter cast membersDaniel Radcliffe as Harry Potter: A 13-year-old British wizard famous for surviving his parents’ murder at the hands of the evil dark wizard Lord Voldemort as an infant, who now enters his third year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.[5]Rupert Grint as Ron Weasley: Harry’s best friend at Hogwarts and a younger member of the Weasley wizarding family.[5]Emma Watson as Hermione Granger: Harry’s other best friend and the trio’s brains.[5]Robbie Coltrane as Rubeus Hagrid: The gamekeeper and new Care of Magical Creatures teacher at Hogwarts.[6]Michael Gambon as Albus Dumbledore: The headmaster of Hogwarts and one of the greatest wizards of all time.[7] Gambon assumed the role after Richard Harris, who played Dumbledore in the previous two films, died of Hodgkin’s disease on 25 October 2002, three weeks before the second film’s release.[8] Despite his illness, Harris was determined to film his part, telling a visiting David Heyman not to recast the role.[9] Four months after Harris’s death, Cuarón chose Gambon as his replacement.[7] Gambon was unconcerned with bettering or copying Harris, giving his own interpretation instead, but putting on a slight Irish accent for the role as an homage to him.[10][11] He completed his scenes in three weeks.[12] Rumours of Ian McKellen being offered the role started to spread, but when asked he rejected the rumours and stated he had played a similar character in Gandalf of The Lord of the Rings trilogy.

In January 2004, Lego owner and CEO Kjeld Kirk Kristiansen announced a change in direction for the company, which at the time was facing a DKK 1.4 billion loss, and that the company would focus on core products and not “big, movie-related IPs such as Harry Potter”.[2] A week later, the company clarified that this did not mean any immediate “radical changes”, and that the Harry Potter theme would continue.

(Hedwig’s Theme)Edit This is the final movie in the Harry Potter series to use Hedwig’s Theme in its original, gradually building form during the opening (until the credits of Deathly Hallows Part 2).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *