harry potter azkaban – Rowling (Joanne Kathleen Rowling), using her grandmother’s name as her second name because she has no middle name….

harry potter azkaban – Rowling (Joanne Kathleen Rowling), using her grandmother’s name as her second name because she has no middle name….

and a real historical person, a 14th-century scribe, Sir Nicolas Flamel, is described as a holder of the Philosopher’s Stone.[40] Other medieval elements in Hogwarts include coats-of-arms and medieval weapons on the walls, letters written on parchment and sealed with wax, the Great Hall of Hogwarts which is similar to the Great Hall of Camelot, the use of Latin phrases, the tents put up for Quidditch tournaments are similar to the “marvellous tents” put up for knightly tournaments, imaginary animals like dragons and unicorns which exist around Hogwarts, and the banners with heraldic animals for the four Houses of Hogwarts.[40] Many of the motifs of the Potter stories such as the hero’s quest invoking objects that confer invisibility, magical animals and trees, a forest full of danger and the recognition of a character based upon scars are drawn from medieval French Arthurian romances.[40] Other aspects borrowed from French Arthurian romances include the use of owls as messengers, werewolves as characters, and white deer.[40] The American scholars Heather Arden and Kathrn Lorenz in particular argue that many aspects of the Potter stories are inspired by a 14th-century French Arthurian romance, Claris et Laris, writing of the “startling” similarities between the adventures of Potter and the knight Claris.[40] Arden and Lorenz noted that Rowling graduated from the University of Exeter in 1986 with a degree in French literature and spent a year living in France afterwards.[40] Arnden and Lorenz wrote about the similarity between the Arthurian romances, where Camelot is a place of wonder and safety, and from where the heroic knights must venture forth facing various perils, usually in an enchanted forest;and a real historical person, a 14th-century scribe, Sir Nicolas Flamel, is described as a holder of the Philosopher’s Stone.[40] Other medieval elements in Hogwarts include coats-of-arms and medieval weapons on the walls, letters written on parchment and sealed with wax, the Great Hall of Hogwarts which is similar to the Great Hall of Camelot, the use of Latin phrases, the tents put up for Quidditch tournaments are similar to the “marvellous tents” put up for knightly tournaments, imaginary animals like dragons and unicorns which exist around Hogwarts, and the banners with heraldic animals for the four Houses of Hogwarts.[40] Many of the motifs of the Potter stories such as the hero’s quest invoking objects that confer invisibility, magical animals and trees, a forest full of danger and the recognition of a character based upon scars are drawn from medieval French Arthurian romances.[40] Other aspects borrowed from French Arthurian romances include the use of owls as messengers, werewolves as characters, and white deer.[40] The American scholars Heather Arden and Kathrn Lorenz in particular argue that many aspects of the Potter stories are inspired by a 14th-century French Arthurian romance, Claris et Laris, writing of the “startling” similarities between the adventures of Potter and the knight Claris.[40] Arden and Lorenz noted that Rowling graduated from the University of Exeter in 1986 with a degree in French literature and spent a year living in France afterwards.[40] Arnden and Lorenz wrote about the similarity between the Arthurian romances, where Camelot is a place of wonder and safety, and from where the heroic knights must venture forth facing various perils, usually in an enchanted forest;and Hogwarts, likewise a wondrous safe place, where Harry Potter and friends must periodically venture forth from to the magical forest that surrounds Hogwarts.[40] In the same way that knights in the Arthurian romances usually have a female helper, who is very intelligent and has a connection with nature, Harry has Hermione who plays a similar role.[40] Like an Arthurian knight, Harry receives advice and encouragement from his mentor, Albus Dumbledore, who resembles both Merlin and King Arthur, but must vanquish his foes alone.[40] Arnden and Lorenz wrote that with Rowling’s books, the characters are “…not a simple reworking of the well-known heroes of romance, but a protean melding of different characters to form new ones…”.[40] However, Lorenz and Arnden argue the main inspiration for Harry Potter was Sir Percival, one of the Knights of the Round Table who searches for the Holy Grail.[40] Both Potter and Sir Percival had an “orphaned or semi-orphaned youth, with inherent nobility and powers”, being raised by relatives who tried to keep them away from the places where they really belong, Hogwarts and Camelot respectively.[40] Both Percival and Potter are however outsiders in the places that they belong, unfamiliar with the rules of knighthood and magic, but both show extraordinary natural abilities with Percival proving himself an exceptional fighter while Potter is an excellent player of Quidditch.[40] And finally, both Percival and Potter found love and acceptance from surrogate families, in the form of the Knights of the Round Table and the Weasley family respectively.[40] Each of the seven books is set over the course of one school year.and a real historical person, a 14th-century scribe, Sir Nicolas Flamel, is described as a holder of the Philosopher’s Stone.[40] Other medieval elements in Hogwarts include coats-of-arms and medieval weapons on the walls, letters written on parchment and sealed with wax, the Great Hall of Hogwarts which is similar to the Great Hall of Camelot, the use of Latin phrases, the tents put up for Quidditch tournaments are similar to the “marvellous tents” put up for knightly tournaments, imaginary animals like dragons and unicorns which exist around Hogwarts, and the banners with heraldic animals for the four Houses of Hogwarts.[40] Many of the motifs of the Potter stories such as the hero’s quest invoking objects that confer invisibility, magical animals and trees, a forest full of danger and the recognition of a character based upon scars are drawn from medieval French Arthurian romances.[40] Other aspects borrowed from French Arthurian romances include the use of owls as messengers, werewolves as characters, and white deer.[40] The American scholars Heather Arden and Kathrn Lorenz in particular argue that many aspects of the Potter stories are inspired by a 14th-century French Arthurian romance, Claris et Laris, writing of the “startling” similarities between the adventures of Potter and the knight Claris.[40] Arden and Lorenz noted that Rowling graduated from the University of Exeter in 1986 with a degree in French literature and spent a year living in France afterwards.[40] Arnden and Lorenz wrote about the similarity between the Arthurian romances, where Camelot is a place of wonder and safety, and from where the heroic knights must venture forth facing various perils, usually in an enchanted forest;and Hogwarts, likewise a wondrous safe place, where Harry Potter and friends must periodically venture forth from to the magical forest that surrounds Hogwarts.[40] In the same way that knights in the Arthurian romances usually have a female helper, who is very intelligent and has a connection with nature, Harry has Hermione who plays a similar role.[40] Like an Arthurian knight, Harry receives advice and encouragement from his mentor, Albus Dumbledore, who resembles both Merlin and King Arthur, but must vanquish his foes alone.[40] Arnden and Lorenz wrote that with Rowling’s books, the characters are “…not a simple reworking of the well-known heroes of romance, but a protean melding of different characters to form new ones…”.[40] However, Lorenz and Arnden argue the main inspiration for Harry Potter was Sir Percival, one of the Knights of the Round Table who searches for the Holy Grail.[40] Both Potter and Sir Percival had an “orphaned or semi-orphaned youth, with inherent nobility and powers”, being raised by relatives who tried to keep them away from the places where they really belong, Hogwarts and Camelot respectively.[40] Both Percival and Potter are however outsiders in the places that they belong, unfamiliar with the rules of knighthood and magic, but both show extraordinary natural abilities with Percival proving himself an exceptional fighter while Potter is an excellent player of Quidditch.[40] And finally, both Percival and Potter found love and acceptance from surrogate families, in the form of the Knights of the Round Table and the Weasley family respectively.[40] Each of the seven books is set over the course of one school year.Rowling (Joanne Kathleen Rowling), using her grandmother’s name as her second name because she has no middle name.[56][58] Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone was published by Bloomsbury, the publisher of all Harry Potter books in the United Kingdom, on 26 June 1997.[59] It was released in the United States on 1 September 1998 by Scholastic – the American publisher of the books – as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,[60] after Rowling had received US$105,000 for the American rights – a record amount for a children’s book by an unknown author.[61] Fearing that American readers would not associate the word “philosopher” with magic (although the Philosopher’s Stone is an ancient tradition in alchemy), Scholastic insisted that the book be given the title Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone for the American market.[62] The second book, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, was originally published in the UK on 2 July 1998 and in the US on 2 June 1999.and a real historical person, a 14th-century scribe, Sir Nicolas Flamel, is described as a holder of the Philosopher’s Stone.[40] Other medieval elements in Hogwarts include coats-of-arms and medieval weapons on the walls, letters written on parchment and sealed with wax, the Great Hall of Hogwarts which is similar to the Great Hall of Camelot, the use of Latin phrases, the tents put up for Quidditch tournaments are similar to the “marvellous tents” put up for knightly tournaments, imaginary animals like dragons and unicorns which exist around Hogwarts, and the banners with heraldic animals for the four Houses of Hogwarts.[40] Many of the motifs of the Potter stories such as the hero’s quest invoking objects that confer invisibility, magical animals and trees, a forest full of danger and the recognition of a character based upon scars are drawn from medieval French Arthurian romances.[40] Other aspects borrowed from French Arthurian romances include the use of owls as messengers, werewolves as characters, and white deer.[40] The American scholars Heather Arden and Kathrn Lorenz in particular argue that many aspects of the Potter stories are inspired by a 14th-century French Arthurian romance, Claris et Laris, writing of the “startling” similarities between the adventures of Potter and the knight Claris.[40] Arden and Lorenz noted that Rowling graduated from the University of Exeter in 1986 with a degree in French literature and spent a year living in France afterwards.[40] Arnden and Lorenz wrote about the similarity between the Arthurian romances, where Camelot is a place of wonder and safety, and from where the heroic knights must venture forth facing various perils, usually in an enchanted forest;and Hogwarts, likewise a wondrous safe place, where Harry Potter and friends must periodically venture forth from to the magical forest that surrounds Hogwarts.[40] In the same way that knights in the Arthurian romances usually have a female helper, who is very intelligent and has a connection with nature, Harry has Hermione who plays a similar role.[40] Like an Arthurian knight, Harry receives advice and encouragement from his mentor, Albus Dumbledore, who resembles both Merlin and King Arthur, but must vanquish his foes alone.[40] Arnden and Lorenz wrote that with Rowling’s books, the characters are “…not a simple reworking of the well-known heroes of romance, but a protean melding of different characters to form new ones…”.[40] However, Lorenz and Arnden argue the main inspiration for Harry Potter was Sir Percival, one of the Knights of the Round Table who searches for the Holy Grail.[40] Both Potter and Sir Percival had an “orphaned or semi-orphaned youth, with inherent nobility and powers”, being raised by relatives who tried to keep them away from the places where they really belong, Hogwarts and Camelot respectively.[40] Both Percival and Potter are however outsiders in the places that they belong, unfamiliar with the rules of knighthood and magic, but both show extraordinary natural abilities with Percival proving himself an exceptional fighter while Potter is an excellent player of Quidditch.[40] And finally, both Percival and Potter found love and acceptance from surrogate families, in the form of the Knights of the Round Table and the Weasley family respectively.[40] Each of the seven books is set over the course of one school year.Rowling (Joanne Kathleen Rowling), using her grandmother’s name as her second name because she has no middle name.[56][58] Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone was published by Bloomsbury, the publisher of all Harry Potter books in the United Kingdom, on 26 June 1997.[59] It was released in the United States on 1 September 1998 by Scholastic – the American publisher of the books – as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,[60] after Rowling had received US$105,000 for the American rights – a record amount for a children’s book by an unknown author.[61] Fearing that American readers would not associate the word “philosopher” with magic (although the Philosopher’s Stone is an ancient tradition in alchemy), Scholastic insisted that the book be given the title Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone for the American market.[62] The second book, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, was originally published in the UK on 2 July 1998 and in the US on 2 June 1999.In 2000, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban was nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Novel, and in 2001, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire won said award.[122] Honours include a commendation for the Carnegie Medal (1997),[123] a short listing for the Guardian Children’s Award (1998), and numerous listings on the notable books, editors’ Choices, and best books lists of the American Library Association, The New York Times, Chicago Public Library, and Publishers Weekly.[124] In 2002, sociologist Andrew Blake named Harry Potter a British pop culture icon along with the likes of James Bond and Sherlock Holmes.[125] In 2003, four of the books were named in the top 24 of the BBC’s The Big Read survey of the best loved novels in the UK.[126] A 2004 study found that books in the series were commonly read aloud in elementary schools in San Diego County, California.[127] Based on a 2007 online poll, the U.S. National Education Association listed the series in its “Teachers’ Top 100 Books for Children”.[128] Three of the books placed among the “Top 100 Chapter Books” of all time, or children’s novels, in a 2012 survey published by School Library Journal: Sorcerer’s Stone ranked number three, Prisoner of Azkaban 12th, and Goblet of Fire 98th.[129] In 2012, the opening ceremony of the 2012 Summer Olympics in London featured a 100-foot tall rendition of Lord Voldemort in a segment designed to show off the UK’s cultural icons.[130] In November 2019, the BBC listed the Harry Potter series on its list of the 100 most influential novels.[131]Literary criticism Early in its history, Harry Potter received positive reviews.

and a real historical person, a 14th-century scribe, Sir Nicolas Flamel, is described as a holder of the Philosopher’s Stone.[40] Other medieval elements in Hogwarts include coats-of-arms and medieval weapons on the walls, letters written on parchment and sealed with wax, the Great Hall of Hogwarts which is similar to the Great Hall of Camelot, the use of Latin phrases, the tents put up for Quidditch tournaments are similar to the “marvellous tents” put up for knightly tournaments, imaginary animals like dragons and unicorns which exist around Hogwarts, and the banners with heraldic animals for the four Houses of Hogwarts.[40] Many of the motifs of the Potter stories such as the hero’s quest invoking objects that confer invisibility, magical animals and trees, a forest full of danger and the recognition of a character based upon scars are drawn from medieval French Arthurian romances.[40] Other aspects borrowed from French Arthurian romances include the use of owls as messengers, werewolves as characters, and white deer.[40] The American scholars Heather Arden and Kathrn Lorenz in particular argue that many aspects of the Potter stories are inspired by a 14th-century French Arthurian romance, Claris et Laris, writing of the “startling” similarities between the adventures of Potter and the knight Claris.[40] Arden and Lorenz noted that Rowling graduated from the University of Exeter in 1986 with a degree in French literature and spent a year living in France afterwards.[40] Arnden and Lorenz wrote about the similarity between the Arthurian romances, where Camelot is a place of wonder and safety, and from where the heroic knights must venture forth facing various perils, usually in an enchanted forest;and Hogwarts, likewise a wondrous safe place, where Harry Potter and friends must periodically venture forth from to the magical forest that surrounds Hogwarts.[40] In the same way that knights in the Arthurian romances usually have a female helper, who is very intelligent and has a connection with nature, Harry has Hermione who plays a similar role.[40] Like an Arthurian knight, Harry receives advice and encouragement from his mentor, Albus Dumbledore, who resembles both Merlin and King Arthur, but must vanquish his foes alone.[40] Arnden and Lorenz wrote that with Rowling’s books, the characters are “…not a simple reworking of the well-known heroes of romance, but a protean melding of different characters to form new ones…”.[40] However, Lorenz and Arnden argue the main inspiration for Harry Potter was Sir Percival, one of the Knights of the Round Table who searches for the Holy Grail.[40] Both Potter and Sir Percival had an “orphaned or semi-orphaned youth, with inherent nobility and powers”, being raised by relatives who tried to keep them away from the places where they really belong, Hogwarts and Camelot respectively.[40] Both Percival and Potter are however outsiders in the places that they belong, unfamiliar with the rules of knighthood and magic, but both show extraordinary natural abilities with Percival proving himself an exceptional fighter while Potter is an excellent player of Quidditch.[40] And finally, both Percival and Potter found love and acceptance from surrogate families, in the form of the Knights of the Round Table and the Weasley family respectively.[40] Each of the seven books is set over the course of one school year.Rowling (Joanne Kathleen Rowling), using her grandmother’s name as her second name because she has no middle name.[56][58] Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone was published by Bloomsbury, the publisher of all Harry Potter books in the United Kingdom, on 26 June 1997.[59] It was released in the United States on 1 September 1998 by Scholastic – the American publisher of the books – as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,[60] after Rowling had received US$105,000 for the American rights – a record amount for a children’s book by an unknown author.[61] Fearing that American readers would not associate the word “philosopher” with magic (although the Philosopher’s Stone is an ancient tradition in alchemy), Scholastic insisted that the book be given the title Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone for the American market.[62] The second book, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, was originally published in the UK on 2 July 1998 and in the US on 2 June 1999.

There’s no challenge.”[15] In the “Rubbish Bin” section of her website, Rowling maintains that she had no role in choosing directors for the films, writing “Anyone who thinks I could (or would) have ‘veto-ed’ him [Spielberg] needs their Quick-Quotes Quill serviced.”[16] After Spielberg left, conversations began with other directors, including Chris Columbus, Jonathan Demme, Terry Gilliam, Mike Newell, Alan Parker, Wolfgang Petersen, Rob Reiner, Tim Robbins, Brad Silberling, and Peter Weir.[17] Petersen and Reiner both pulled out of the running in March 2000.[18] It was then narrowed down to Columbus, Gilliam, Parker, and Silberling.[19] Rowling’s first choice was Terry Gilliam.[20] However, on 28 March 2000 Columbus was appointed as director of the film, with Warner Bros.

The Game Boy Advance release played as a traditional Role playing game, similar to games like Dragon Quest.[1] The PlayStation 2 version features mini-games compatible with the EyeToy.[3] In addition to playing as the titular character Harry, the game also allows the player to control Hermione and Ron, as well as fly Buckbeak, and control Harry’s pet owl, Hedwig.[4] Reception Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban received “mixed or average” reviews, according to video game review aggregator website Metacritic.[2]GameSpot were positive about the game, scoring 7/10 or above across releases,[21] with a high of 7.5 out of 10 for the GBA version.[18]Frank Provo of GameSpot was very positive about the GBA game’s recreation of the novel;

As of 2018[update], there are ten motion picture adaptions based on the world, characters and books created by J.

Awards in the “Console Family”, “Original Musical Composition” and “PC Family” categories.[139]Lego Harry Potter: Years 1-4 won the Kotaku “best adapted game” award in 2010, with Brian Crecente proclaiming it to be the “Best Lego Game to Date.”[140] The game was nominated for two awards in the 7th British Academy Games Awards, in the “family” and “handheld” sections.[141] In addition, it was nominated for “Best Adapted Video Game” for the Spike Video Game Awards in 2010.[142] The musical score of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by Jeremy Soule received a BAFTA Award for Original Music in 2004.[143] Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince received a BAFTA nomination in 2010 for James Hannigan’s music score,[144] and won an International Film Music Critics Association (IFMCA) Award for best video game score in 2009.[145]Book of Spells received a nomination for “game innovation” at the BAFTA Awards in 2013.[146] As of 2014, the Harry Potter video game series was stated to have sold $1.5 billion in sales.[147] .

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