harry potter address – and Fawkes’s timing had to be very precise, as arriving earlier would probably have prevented the battle with the …

harry potter address – and Fawkes’s timing had to be very precise, as arriving earlier would probably have prevented the battle with the …

Rowling’s official website.[2] The family background of Dean Thomas was removed because Rowling and her publishers considered it an “unnecessary digression,” and she considered Neville Longbottom’s own journey of discovery “more important to the central plot.”[3]PublicationEdit Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets was published in the UK on 2 July 1998 and in the US on 2 June 1999.[4][5] It immediately took first place in UK bestseller lists, displacing popular authors such as John Grisham, Tom Clancy,[1] and Terry Pratchett[6] and making Rowling the first author to win the British Book Awards Children’s Book of the Year for two years in succession.[7] In June 1999, it went straight to the top of three US bestseller lists,[8] including in The New York Times.[9] First edition printings had several errors, which were fixed in subsequent reprints.[10] Initially, Dumbledore said Voldemort was the last remaining ancestor of Salazar Slytherin instead of his descendant.[10]Gilderoy Lockhart’s book on werewolves is entitled Weekends with Werewolves at one point and Wanderings with Werewolves later in the book.[11]Critical responseEdit Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets was met with near-universal acclaim.Rowling’s official website.[2] The family background of Dean Thomas was removed because Rowling and her publishers considered it an “unnecessary digression,” and she considered Neville Longbottom’s own journey of discovery “more important to the central plot.”[3]PublicationEdit Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets was published in the UK on 2 July 1998 and in the US on 2 June 1999.[4][5] It immediately took first place in UK bestseller lists, displacing popular authors such as John Grisham, Tom Clancy,[1] and Terry Pratchett[6] and making Rowling the first author to win the British Book Awards Children’s Book of the Year for two years in succession.[7] In June 1999, it went straight to the top of three US bestseller lists,[8] including in The New York Times.[9] First edition printings had several errors, which were fixed in subsequent reprints.[10] Initially, Dumbledore said Voldemort was the last remaining ancestor of Salazar Slytherin instead of his descendant.[10]Gilderoy Lockhart’s book on werewolves is entitled Weekends with Werewolves at one point and Wanderings with Werewolves later in the book.[11]Critical responseEdit Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets was met with near-universal acclaim.and Fawkes’s timing had to be very precise, as arriving earlier would probably have prevented the battle with the basilisk, while arriving later would have been fatal to Harry and Ginny.[18]Awards and honoursEdit Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets was the recipient of several awards.[19] The American Library Association listed the novel among its 2000 Notable Children’s Books,[20] as well as its Best Books for Young Adults.[21] In 1999, Booklist named Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets as one of its Editors’ Choices,[22] and as one of its Top Ten Fantasy Novels for Youth.[19] The Cooperative Children’s Book Center made the novel a CCBC Choice of 2000 in the “Fiction for Children” category.[23] The novel also won Children’s Book of the Year British Book Award,[24] and was shortlisted for the 1998 Guardian Children’s Award and the 1998 Carnegie Award.[19] Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets won the Nestlé Smarties Book Prize 1998 Gold Medal in the 9–11 years division.[24] Rowling also won two other Nestlé Smarties Book Prizes for Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone and Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.

year later, the US edition was selected as an American Library Association Notable Book, a Publishers Weekly Best Book of 1998, and a New York Public Library 1998 Best Book of the Year, and won Parenting Magazine’s Book of the Year Award for 1998,[23] the School Library Journal Best Book of the Year, and the American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults.[16] In August 1999, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone topped the New York Times list of best-selling fiction,[39] and stayed near the top of the list for much of 1999 and 2000, until the New York Times split its list into children’s and adult sections under pressure from other publishers who were eager to see their books given higher placings.[25][37]Publishers Weekly’s report in December 2001 on cumulative sales of children’s fiction placed Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone 19th among hardbacks (over 5 million copies) and 7th among paperbacks (over 6.6 million copies).[40] In May 2008, Scholastic announced the creation of a 10th Anniversary Edition of the book[41] that was released on 1 October 2008[42] to mark the tenth anniversary of the original American release.[41] For the fifteenth anniversary of the books, Scholastic re-released Sorcerer’s Stone, along with the other six novels in the series, with new cover art by Kazu Kibuishi in 2013.[43][44][45]TranslationsEdit Main article: Harry Potter in translation By mid-2008, official translations of the book had been published in 67 languages.[46][47] By November 2017, the book had been translated into 80 languages, the 80th being Lowland Scots.[48] Bloomsbury have published translations in Latin and in Ancient Greek,[49][50] with the latter being described as “one of the most important pieces of Ancient Greek prose written in many centuries”.[51] See also: Harry Potter influences and analogues Philip Nel highlighted the influence of Jane Austen, whom Rowling has greatly admired since the age of twelve.

Rowling revealed that the play would “explore the previously untold story of Harry’s early years as an orphan and outcast”.[8] The following May, Rowling began establishing the creative team for the project.[9] On 26 June 2015, this project was officially confirmed under the title of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child,[10] and it was revealed it would receive its world premiere in mid-2016 at London’s Palace Theatre.[11] The announcement marked the eighteenth anniversary of the publication of the first Harry Potter novel, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone,[12] published on 26 June 1997.[13] On announcing plans for the project, Rowling stated that the play would not be a prequel.[14] In response to queries regarding the choice of a play rather than a new novel, Rowling stated that she “is confident that when audiences see the play they will agree that it is the only proper medium for the story”.[15] Rowling also assured audiences that the play would contain an entirely new story and would not be a rehashing of previously explored content.[16] On 24 September 2015, Rowling announced that the play had been split into two parts.[17] The parts are designed to be viewed on the same day or consecutively over two evenings.[18][19] On 23 October 2015, it was confirmed the plays were set nineteen years after the conclusion of the final novel Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows,[20] and would open at London’s Palace Theatre in July 2016.[21] The plays principally follow Harry Potter, now Head of the Department of Magical Law Enforcement, and his younger son, Albus Severus Potter.[22][23] The play is divided in two parts, consisting of two acts each.

This was such a fantastic return to Hogwarts with new features such as the Room or Requirement, the Dursley’s House on Privet Drive and if you stick around to the end you’ll get a chance to learn how you can meet and greet with your favourite characters from the Wizarding World of Harry Potter such as Harry Potter, Ron Weasley, Hermione Granger, Draco Malloy and many more!

Rowling’s official website.[2] The family background of Dean Thomas was removed because Rowling and her publishers considered it an “unnecessary digression,” and she considered Neville Longbottom’s own journey of discovery “more important to the central plot.”[3]PublicationEdit Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets was published in the UK on 2 July 1998 and in the US on 2 June 1999.[4][5] It immediately took first place in UK bestseller lists, displacing popular authors such as John Grisham, Tom Clancy,[1] and Terry Pratchett[6] and making Rowling the first author to win the British Book Awards Children’s Book of the Year for two years in succession.[7] In June 1999, it went straight to the top of three US bestseller lists,[8] including in The New York Times.[9] First edition printings had several errors, which were fixed in subsequent reprints.[10] Initially, Dumbledore said Voldemort was the last remaining ancestor of Salazar Slytherin instead of his descendant.[10]Gilderoy Lockhart’s book on werewolves is entitled Weekends with Werewolves at one point and Wanderings with Werewolves later in the book.[11]Critical responseEdit Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets was met with near-universal acclaim.

See also: Magic in Harry Potter The entire Harry Potter series is set from 1991 to 1998 aside from the opening chapter of the first book, which takes place on 1 November 1981, and the epilogue of the seventh book, which takes place on 1 September 2017.The sport appears in every book except the seventh;[HP7] school matches are canceled in the fourth due to the need to use the pitch for the Triwizard Tournament, but Harry attends the Quidditch World Cup as a guest of the Weasley family.[HP4] Other wizard games and sports include Gobstones (a version of marbles in which the stones squirt foul-smelling liquid into the other player’s face when they lose a point), Exploding Snap (a card game in which the cards explode), and Wizard Chess (in which the pieces are sentient and under the command of the player).as described by Rita Skeeter, “The Prophet exists to sell itself!”[23] The Prophet remains respectable for the first three books, but by Goblet of Fire, it has hired Rita Skeeter, an unscrupulous journalist who supplies several thrilling and blatantly false articles.[24] These include an article that, while correctly asserting that Hagrid is part giant, also makes numerous scurrilous accusations about his personal character, and declares Harry “disturbed and dangerous” based on remarks by Draco Malfoy.

Further information: List of Harry Potter characters The gameplay of Deathly Hallows – Part 2 differs from Part 1, in order to address complaints made with the previous game.[4][5][6] The game progresses linearly, through cutscenes, but does not include side missions like the previous game.[4] Combat in Deathly Hallows – Part 2 involves button presses which initiates spell-casting as an attack.

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